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Benefits of an Annual Exam | Maryland Employee Benefit Brokers

Have you ever heard the proverb “Knowledge is power?” It means that knowledge is more powerful than just physical strength and with knowledge people can produce powerful results. This applies to your annual medical physical as well! The #1 goal of your annual exam is to GAIN KNOWLEDGE. Annual exams offer you and your doctor a baseline for your health as well as being key to detecting early signs of diseases and conditions.

The #1 goal of your annual exam is to  GAIN KNOWLEDGE

According to Malcom Thalor, MD, “A good general exam should include a comprehensive medical history, family history, lifestyle review, problem-focused physical exam, appropriate screening and diagnostic tests and vaccinations, with time for discussion, assessment and education. And a good health care provider will always focus first and foremost on your health goals.”

Early detection of chronic diseases can save both your personal pocketbook as well as your life! By scheduling AND attending your annual physical, you are able to cut down on medical costs of undiagnosed conditions. Catching a disease early means you are able to attack it early. If you wait until you are exhibiting symptoms or have been symptomatic for a long while, then the disease may be to a stage that is costly to treat. Early detection gives you a jump start on treatments and can reduce your out of pocket expenses.

When you are prepared to speak with your Primary Care Physician (PCP), you can set the agenda for your appointment so that you get all your questions answered as well as your PCP’s questions. Here are some tips for a successful annual physical exam:

  • Bring a list of medications you are currently taking—You may even take pictures of the bottles so they can see the strength and how many.
  • Have a list of any symptoms you are having ready to discuss.
  • Bring the results of any relevant surgeries, tests, and medical procedures
  • Share a list of the names and numbers of your other doctors that you see on a regular basis.
  • If you have an implanted device (insulin pump, spinal cord stimulator, etc) bring the device card with you.
  • Bring a list of questions! Doctors want well informed patients leaving their office. Here are some sample questions you may want to ask:
    • What vaccines do I need?
    • What health screenings do I need?
    • What lifestyle changes do I need to make?
    • Am I on the right medications?

Becoming a well-informed patient who follows through on going to their annual exam as well as follows the advice given to them from their physician after asking good questions, will not only save your budget, but it can save your life!

 

 

Ask the Experts: Employee on modified assignment due to a workers’ comp claim | Maryland Benefit Advisors

 

Question: We have an employee who is on modified assignment due to a workers’ comp claim. Do we have to pay for the time spent away from work for doctor appointments or does the employee have to use PTO time?

Answer: You may not necessarily have to pay for the time an employee spends at the doctor’s office, but rules vary based on state workers’ compensation laws governing the injured or ill worker’s time off and the details of the situation. The first thing we recommend is determining how your state workers’ compensation laws address this subject.

Typically, when an employee experiences a work-related injury or illness, the employee is referred to a medical provider selected by the employer. When an employee receives medical attention at your direction during normal working hours on working days, it constitutes hours worked. Hours worked are compensable hours therefore you would pay for time spent at those doctor’s appointments.

If, on the other hand, the visits are to the employee’s personal doctor, and the visits are not at your direction, then the time spent away does not qualify as compensable hours. In this case, you treat the absences for medical appointments the same way you treat time away from work for medical absences for any other employee. You should refer to your company’s policy because this time may or may not be compensable. If the time is not compensable, the employee may use paid time off (PTO) or sick leave to go to a doctor’s appointment. This is permissible if your employee is not using PTO while receiving workers’ compensation benefits.

To reiterate, policies regarding employee absences for medical treatment should be governed by your state’s applicable laws and documented in your company policies and handbook. Now is the time to update your policies and handbook if they don’t contain this information. If applicable, review and follow your collective bargaining agreement covering payments for workplace injuries and illnesses. Finally, as an extra precaution, it is always a good idea to consult your counsel with questions regarding workers’ compensation and other employee benefits and leave concerns.

 

Originally posted by www.ThinkHR.com

What you need to know about Voluntary Benefits | Maryland Benefit Advisors

Voluntary Benefits are Supplementary Benefits in addition to the core benefits package that the employee can choose to add.