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Benefits Easy: Intro to Self-Funding | Maryland Benefit Advisors

As the first month of 2018 wraps up, companies have already begun the arduous task of submitting budgets and finding ways to cut costs for the new year. One of the most effective ways to combat increasing health care costs for companies is to move to a Self-Funded insurance plan. By paying for claims out-of-pocket instead of paying a premium to an insurance carrier, companies can save around 20% in administration costs and state taxes. That’s quite a cost savings!

The topic of Self-Funding is huge and so we want to break it down into smaller bites for you to digest. This month we want to tackle a basic introduction to Self-Funding and in the coming months, we will cover the benefits, risks, and the stop-loss associated with this type of plan.

THE BASICS

  • When the employer assumes the financial risk for providing health care benefits to its employees, this is called Self-Funding.
  • Self-Funded plans allow the employer to tailor the benefits plan design to best suit their employees. Employers can look at the demographics of their workforce and decide which benefits would be most utilized as well as cut benefits that are forecasted to be underutilized.
  • While previously most used by large companies, small and mid-sized companies, even with as few as 25 employees, are seeing cost benefits to moving to Self-Funded insurance plans.
  • Companies pay no state premium taxes on self-funded expenditures. This savings is around 5% – 3/5% depending on in which state the company operates.
  • Since employers are paying for claims, they have access to claims data. While keeping within HIPAA privacy guidelines, the employer can identify and reach out to employees with certain at-risk conditions (diabetes, heart disease, stroke) and offer assistance with combating these health concerns. This also allows greater population-wide health intervention like weight loss programs and smoking cessation assistance.
  • Companies typically hire third-party administrators (TPA) to help design and administer the insurance plans. This allows greater control of the plan benefits and claims payments for the company.

As you can see, Self-Funding has many facets. It’s important to gather as much information as you can and weigh the benefits and risks of moving from a Fully-Funded plan for your company to a Self-Funded one. Doing your research and making the move to a Self-Funded plan could help you gain greater control on your healthcare costs and allow you to design an original plan that best fits your employees.

What Are Some Pros & Cons of HIPAA? | Maryland Benefit Advisors

Congress approved the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) to guard the privacy of personal medical information, and to give individuals the right to keep their health insurance coverage for pre-existing conditions in place even if they change jobs. The law has done this, providing important safeguards for patients. But it has also increased the red tape involved in medical care.

History

Congress passed HIPAA in August 1996, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services finalized standards for the electronic exchange, privacy and security of health information in 2002. The rules apply to health plans, health care clearinghouses, and to any health care provider, such as a doctor, who transmits health information in electronic form.

Significance

Congress intended HIPAA to protect individually identifiable health information. Any entity, including a physician’s office, a hospital or other health care facility, or an insurer, that deals with personal health information must follow strict rules about how to handle that information to avoid disclosing it to someone not authorized to see it. For example, Health and Human Services allows physicians and insurance companies to exchange individually identifiable health information to pay a health claim, but would not allow them to release it publicly. Penalties for violating the regulations include civil fines of up to $50,000 per violation, according to Health and Human Services.

Minimum Necessary

According to Health and Human Services, the privacy rule also requires physicians, hospitals, insurers, and other health care entities to use and disclose only the minimum amount of information needed to complete the transaction or fulfill the request. As a practical matter, for example, that means a physician should not send a patient’s entire medical file to an insurer if just one page from the record will suffice to answer the insurer’s query.

Portability

In addition to protecting patients’ privacy, HIPAA also limits the ability of a new employer plan to exclude coverage for pre-existing conditions. This means a person who has health insurance coverage can change jobs — and therefore health plans — without worrying that a condition they already have, such as diabetes or asthma, would not be covered under the new health plan. This was not always the case, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. “In the past, some employers’ group health plans limited, or even denied, coverage if a new employee had such a condition before enrolling in the plan. Under HIPAA, that is not allowed,” the Department of Labor says. HIPAA also prohibits discrimination against employees and their family members based on health histories, previous claims, and genetic information, according to the Department of Labor.

Pros of HIPAA

HIPAA, for the first time, allowed patients the legal right to see, copy, and correct their personal medical information. It also prevented employers from accessing and using personal health information to make employment decisions. And, it enabled patients with pre-existing conditions to change jobs without worrying that their conditions would not be covered under a new employer’s health plan.

Cons of HIPAA

However, HIPAA’s effects have not all been positive. The regulations increased the paperwork burden for doctors considerably, according to the American Medical Association. HIPAA has spawned a mini-industry of companies and consultants who help medical professionals comply with the law’s lengthy provisions. In addition, some professionals who deal with medical paperwork have become overcautious about releasing protected information. For example, some physician’s offices now refuse to mail test results, saying patients need to pick them up in person. And some hospitals require physicians to submit written requests on their own letterhead for information on a patient’s condition, when the law allows this information to be provided by phone.

Originally published by www.livestrong.com