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Ask the Experts: Can a well qualified older candidate fit on a much younger team? | Maryland Benefit Advisors

Question: We recently interviewed an older candidate for a position. She’s well qualified, but the team she would be working with is made up of people who are much younger, and we are worried about how she will fit in. Can the criteria to hire for cultural fit outweigh potential age discrimination concerns?

Answer: Your obligations under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act that protects workers from discrimination on the basis of age still apply, and you should weigh any employment decisions you make based on nondiscriminatory factors that include the applicant’s ability to do the job over age or generational concerns. While you should certainly think about company and even team culture when considering new hires, you may be putting the cart before the horse by worrying about how this new employee might fit, or not fit, with her new team. And, you might be overlooking the notion that older workers and millennials have more in common than you think.

For example, older workers may appreciate flexible work hours or alternative working arrangements, like many younger people in the workforce. Their responsibilities to children in the home may be done, while their younger counterparts may be pre-child-rearing stage. Older workers’ life-long experience, along with their work experience, may be highly valued and respected on a younger team. Older workers may be driven to learn new skills and new ways of working, just like their younger counterparts.

The experience of learning isn’t just about your older worker teaching or mentoring her younger teammates, however. Older employees benefit from working with younger generations in many ways, such as learning new technology, expanding mindsets to think more out-of-the-box when problem solving, and even finding encouragement to learn new skills and to think more creatively.

Adding a new employee of any age will pose challenges to a well-established team. If your candidate has the experience and the drive that will fit the position, assume all involved will enter into the relationship with open minds and will listen and learn from each other.

Originally posted by www.ThinkHR.com

Maryland Employment Law Update – April 2017

 

Employee Benefits Group is committed to keeping you updated with any changes to Maryland’s employment laws.  Below is a list of Employment Law Updates for April 2017:

Unemployment Insurance, Employer Determinations, and Process and Appeal Rights

On April 18, 2017, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan signed legislation (H.B. 139), which specifies the process and timeframe for an employer to exercise appeal rights related to employer determinations under the Unemployment Insurance Law. The legislation also requires the Lower Appeals Division to hear and decide appeals from the review determination decisions.

The law is effective October 1, 2017.

Read MD H.B. 139

Unemployment Insurance Electronic Information

On April 18, 2017, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan signed legislation (H.B. 135) authorizing the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation, individuals, and employers to electronically send certain information and documents relating to unemployment insurance.

The law is effective October 1, 2017.

Read MD H.B. 135

Unemployment Insurance and Employer Exemption Upon Closure

On April 18, 2017, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan signed legislation (H.B. 141) that exempts employees of an employer that closes its business operation or part of its business operation for a definite period for inventory, vacation, or another purpose from the requirement to actively seek work during that period to be eligible to receive unemployment insurance benefits.

The law is effective October 1, 2017.

Read MD H.B. 141

Workers’ Compensation and Tiered and Merit Rating Plans

On April 18, 2017, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan signed legislation (H.B. 1315) authorizing a workers’ compensation insurer to develop a tiered rating plan that establishes discrete tiers based on risk attributes that are not arbitrary, capricious, or unfairly discriminatory and are reasonably related to the insurer’s business and economic purposes. The law also requires an insurer to submit a tiered rating plan to the insurance commissioner at least 30 days in advance of the plan’s use, and authorizes an insurer to use a specified merit rating plan under certain circumstances.

The law is effective October 1, 2017.

Read MD H.B. 1315

Workers’ Compensation, Permanent Total Disability, and Survival of Claim

On April 11, 2017, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan signed legislation (S.B. 426) into law, which clarified that if a covered employee dies from a cause that is not compensable under Md. Labor & Empl. Code Ann. § 9-640 (survival of compensation), the right to compensation that is payable and unpaid on the date of death survives to the extent of $65,000, as increased by the cost of living adjustments.

The law is effective October 1, 2017.

Read MD S.B. 426

Youth Sports Workers Exempted from Covered Employment Under Unemployment Insurance Law

On April 18, 2017, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan signed legislation (S.B. 70) clarifying that work performed by qualifying youth sports workers for youth sports organizations is not covered employment under the Unemployment Insurance Law.

The law is effective October 1, 2017.

Read MD S.B 70

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com